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20121027
20121104
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WMPT (PBS) 28
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English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
on the government response, i spoke a short time ago to the u.s. congressman who represents atlantic city. i asked him what he needs the most. >> we need to get set up because of the devastation that it has caused so many people and this loss, as your reporter described. parts of north jersey, this is the lowest 1/3 of the state. there are parts of north jersey that have lots of structural damage. this has come into homes and businesses that will just be devastating. if you could imagine attempting to clean up without power, how much more difficult that is. getting power restored is of a primary concern, especially along the coast. >> i know it has only been a couple of days, but do you have any sense of how long this will take? the president has said that they will be with the residents of new jersey for however long it will take. >> it will be quite a while. i had an aerial tour with the coast guard this morning and we stressed from the delaware bay which is essentially the delaware bridge. those are rather small communities. they were totally devastated. houses that were crushed like matchbooks
a candidate who is going to govern by asking us to make choices that we haven't anticipated. and as a result, we're going to feel betrayed to some extent, even if we voted for that candidate. >> the debates were the most watched in a long time. your field intersects politics and entertainment. do you think entertainment values had something to do with this? >> well, i think suspense was what was required down to the wire. and that's what we got. one won one, another won another. then a couple of draws. what could be better for keeping people watching? unfortunately, the lack of an answer to who sacrifices what is only the beginning of an endless list that, for me, is a reason to be disappointed, not just in the debates, but in the entire campaign. i want to find out about things that are important, about plutocracy taking over democracy, the widening gulf between the powerful and the powerless. wall street, global warming, on and on. at most, they made a cameo appearance during the debate. and i think they were trivialized by the context. and usually, entirely absent. so i was disappointed o
is to rediscover progressive values and put them forward. i'm arguing for not bigger government but i think different government. >> woodruff: and scott schaefer of public television's kqed profiles a photographer who uses google's street view images to create art. >> you have this distinct feeling of decay. the images almost challenge the viewer. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: hurricane sandy began battering its way ashore today, threatening days of destruction. the huge system had 50 million people in its sights and was already being called a superstorm. the w
mitt romney's proposals to cut personal income and corporate taxes, reduce the size of government, roll back regulation and boost energy exploration could generate jobs but only over the long term. moody's analytics estimated that the president's proposed jobs act would have generated 1.9 million jobs through infrastructure projects, the rehiring of public employees, and tax credits. but the bill was blocked in congress. given that. >> it's simply the case that neither candidate has a plan for dealing with the immediate jobs crisis. >> there's not a whole lot of discussion going on about how to promote jobs right now. because what one would normally talk about is more stimulus, either more government spending or more tax cuts. but the deficit situation has now grown so bad that there's just no appetite for further borrowing at this time. >> maya macguineas runs the committee for a responsible federal budget, a bipartisan group that lobbies congress. she says uncertainty about how the government will deal with the deficit and the huge national debt is inhibiting employers from hiring. >>
at the strategic financial group. while the stock exchanges get back to business, the federal government is getting down to business in responding to the widespread disaster. sylvia hall has the latest on the federal response. >> reporter: as east coast residents survey the mess sandy brought ashore, federal, state and local governments are already coordinating the cleanup. right now, thousands of workers from every level of government are on a rescue mission in new jersey and new york's hardest- hit areas. fema is pulling in generators and working with power companies to get the lights back on. the storm's damage was so severe that president obama quickly declared major disasters in new york and new jersey overnight. the decision frees up federal dollars to help families and businesses recover their losses. it also allows the u.s. to reimburse local and state governments for some of the expenses they'll face as they rebuild. the east coast may be cleaning up, but sandy isn't finished. the storm is plowing inland, dumping snow across the appalachians. with sandy still churning, it's nearly impossib
the idea of an expansive activist federal government -- that's obama, of course -- and a minimal, smaller, shrinking federal government, that's mitt romney. so for all the talk of bipartisanship we've heard in the last two weeks from both candidates, there's not a lot of bipartisanship out there. >> when you speak to republican voters, you've been out around the country a lot, there is a real sense that they are very angry with what's this president has done to the country in terms of expanding government. do democrats feel the same about what mitt romney would do if he were president? >> they do, although in a sense it's a bit below the surface, since they're not experiencing it right now. but we have a similar experience under george w. bush, who tried briefly to governor as a kind of bipartisan moderate, but then turned markedly conservative. so in those days you have the same kind of democratic rage against that republican president that you now have in reverse. it's very difficult to see where the middle ground would be for either of these candidates, and it won't be any easier if we
's been extraordinarily close coordination between state, federal, and local governments. and so we're confident that the assets are prepositioned for an effective response in the aftermath of the storm. r david paulison knows about mobilizing the federal government's response to a hurricane. he was in two weeks after hurricane katrina. are you confident that fema is prepared given the sheer size of this storm, almost a thousand miles in dimer. >> it is a huge storm and the impact will on the storm is so big, it is impacting several states from dc all the way up to maine at the same time. but i am rae very comfortable. we have a great administrator running the organization. he gets it, he's from florida, a good emergency manager. doesn't run around with his hair on fire. so i'm confident they will do a good job. >> on a conference call today n fact, your successor, mr. fugate said the disaster fund at fema has a billion dollars in t more or less. is that enough for this kind of response that will be necessary? >> probably at the end of the day the expenses will be more than that. bu
and businesses. and governments will be spending huge amounts of money to repair subways, roads, and bridges so all of those efforts should help boost economic activity early next year. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: joining us now for a closer look at sandy's economic impact, mark zandi, chief economist at moody's analytics. you know, mark, people often hear that when there's a sdater like zandi, that it's actually a boost to the economy. is that going to be true in this case? >> well, no. this is a natural disaster. disasters are bad for the economy. obviously, the big hit to the economy initially, is what we're seing in new york. you do get rebuilding, and economy benefits from that, but net, net, the economy is in a worse place. natural disasters are bad for the economy, not good. >> susie: you heard in erica's remit some businesses are going to benefit, maybe hox*echl builders and cuk companies. if you look at the economy, who are the winners and losers in terms of various sectors? >> well, there's more losers than winners. the losers would be the restaurants, they're not goin
is that the federal government will be working as closely as possible with the state and local officials and we will not quit until this is done. and the directive i have given-- and i said this yesterday but i will repeat and i think craig and others who are working with me right now know i mean it-- we are not going to tolerate red tape, we're not going to tolerate bureaucracy. >> woodruff: meanwhile, republican mitt romney returned to the campaign trail today with three events in florida. the g.o.p. presidential nominee also mentioned the ongoing recovery in the northeast. >> this is... this is quite a time for the country, as you know. we're... we're going through trauma in a major part of the country, a kind of trauma you've experienced here in florida more than once. and... and it's interesting to see how people come together in a circumstance like this. we've seen folks from all over the country step forward and... and offer contributions. >> woodruff: bumps in the recovery were evident in new york city late today, where the public, bellevue hospital , started evacuating about 500 patien
stronger than the 125,000 analysts were looking for. and the government revised its september new job count up to 148,000. thanks to more people looking for work, the unemployment rate rose slightly to 7.9%. darren gersh has the story from washington d.c. >> reporter: the october employment report makes it clear a jobs recovery is solidly underway. >> i think the key message there is that employment growth has been taken up a notch. over the last three months we've added over 170,000 jobs on average. that's a little bit better than what we've been seeing. that is enough over the long haul to bring the unemployment rate down, but slowly. >> reporter: one of the best things about this jobs report: payroll gains were broad-based. retailing added 36,000 jobs. health care 31,000 jobs. construction 17,000 jobs. manufacturing shook off its recent losses, adding 13,000 jobs. the unemployment rate did tick up to 7.9%. but even that may be a sign of strength. labor force participation had been falling as older workers retired and others gave up looking for work. over the last two months that trend ha
getting enough information from local government about what they can expect and when? do people feel well informed? >> i think they do. i mean those who are able to get t receiving it is a problem, there has been no shortage of briefings by the mayor, governor cuomo, governor christie, utility company executives. they are doing lots of outreach but most of the news isn't that good if you are without power. so i don't know how much it makes people feel better. >> suarez: patrick mcgeehan from "the new york times", thanks for joining us. >> sure, thank you. >> brown: hurricane sandy also devastated parts of the caribbean, including haiti, where 54 people died. special correspondent fred de sam lazaro filed a dispatch and photos from port au prince. those are on our "world" page. >> woodruff: and we turn now to syria. the newshour sent freelance video journalist toby muse there recently to see how civilians are faring. as margaret warner reports, many have become targets in the country's civil war. a warning-- some images may be disturbing. >> warner: within the walls of a secret school in n
in the government's response to the financial crisis and among the first to identify the foreclosure problem and call for action to help troubled homeowners. her leadership of the f.d.i.c. through it tumultuous time, forbes named her the second most powerful woman in the world behind angela merkel. she has a new book called, "bull by the horns: fighting to save main street from wall street, and wall street from itself." i'm pleased to have her here at this table again. was the title easy for you? >> the title was my publisher's. i have to admit. it's a good title. my title was, it could have been different." but that title probably sells more book >> the dedication-- to me m.r.i. beloved children and my husband, scott. a true-- >> is that because he had a wife who was working all the time? >> yes, and even when she was home she was preoccupied with work. he filled in through the crisis. the kids never resented their stay-away mom because he was there for the parent teacher conferences, the school concerts. he was there for all of that. >> rose: looking back at that tenure what was the proud
for the government's official employment report, which comes out tomorrow. factoring in job losses in state and local government, adp projects the labor department will likely say the economy created roughly 130,000 jobs in october. barclays economist michael gapen expects the unemployment rate will hold steady tomorrow at 7.8%. and gapen expects the pattern of moderate job gains over the last year will be the pattern for the coming year, too. >> 150,000 to 160,000 jobs a month may not be a bang-out kind of number that gets everybody happy, but it's going to work. it will work in the sense of gradually reducing slack, gradually re-employing the unemployed, and pushing downward the unemployment rate. >> reporter: manufacturing was a soft spot in the adp report, showing a loss of 8,000 jobs. but it was no surprise, given the recent slowing in global sales. >> six out of the ten top markets that we have are seeing a contraction right now. and it is very tough for them to make inroads in terms of increasing exports to those nations. >> reporter: but housing looks relatively strong; autos and machinery, t
. a city choked by checkpoints. police and government officials are being assassinated virtually every day. and officials say al qaeda in iraq is now regrouping. after watching his brother die in front of him, he's struggling. a much-loved brother by a bomb captured by a bystander on a mobile phone. what happened that day in july still haunts him. >> i can't sleep, not a wink. our whole family has been destroyed, especially my mother. >> iraqi families are no longer couped up at home as they were in the darkest days of the civil war. but a power sharing agreement between shiites and even kurds has led to political pa rale cis, and sectarianism still lives below the surface here. -- paralysis and sectarianism still lives below the surface here. this is still a traumatized society, and there are now the war in syria could reignite sectarian tensions here. more than 200 civilians have already been killed in violence this month, and many here mourn the future they hoped for. >> the regional impact of the war in syria still not fully known. in just days, china is due to make an announcement whi
the course of this political season. if you look at what happened in government, there has not been much talk of climate change, either, by this administration. >> that is true. certainly the obama administration has put forward a carbon tax plan early in the administration, but that ended up floundering in congress -- put forward a carbon cap plan. he has done other things in terms of increasing auto fuel efficiency, things in terms of back door, policies, but he clearly has not taken on this problem the way he had promised to back in 2008. >> you have written about the need for more research into climate change so that we can understand where these storms come from, but also more comprehensive response from america in terms of dealing with its infrastructure. we have seen the infrastructure problems caused by hurricane sandy. >> that is clearly true. you have 3.7 million americans who live within just a few feet of high tide. those are the people who are always vulnerable when you have a big storm like this one. you have new york city youth -- losing huge parts of its infrastructure, losing
the cause of death. doctors have been fined and now the independentian government is considering tightening things up. >> some locals call it neocolonialism. foreign drug companies using poor and illiterate indians as guinea pigs in drug trials. >> our family has been destroyed by this and the drug company should know it. >> the doctors who carry out the trials may be in denial. but they are now being disciplined. and lawyers are asking if we can trust the results of the trials. >> the global implication potentially would be whether those findings can be safely relied upon. >> india has obvious eye trackses to the foreign drug -- attractions to the foreign drug companies. there are educated, english-speaking doctors, and a vast population from which to choose trial subjects, all of whom are required under indian law to give their informed consent. >> i put my thumbprint on the document and my daughter-in-law signed in hindi, but the form was in english, so we couldn't understand everything. >> but that was enough for a 3-day-old healthy boy to be given a trial polio vaccine. he had a severe
the country when i worked in the federal government. i've seen all types of disasters. i have to tell you what i saw last night in downtown manhattan, what went on on the south shore of long island were some of the worst conditions that i had seen. >> woodruff: like new york, new jersey was also declared a federal disaster area. >> the level of devastation at the jersey shore is unthinkable. >> woodruff: by the time sandy made land fall, it had been downgraded from a hurricane. but governor chris christie said today the distinction made little difference to badly damaged beach towns. >> those out there who are facing loss, devastation, and a heart-breaking reality that your home may be gone, we're with you. we have a long road ahead of us but i have complete confidence we're going to come out of this better and stronger than before. >> woodruff: there will be much to rebuild. the storm destroyed a large section of the famed atlantic city board walk and farther north 1,000 people had to flee their homes after the water charged over a burm. some people had to be rescued late last night in a town
? because it's what guides us. it's what... it allows us the opportunity to govern ourselves. >> over a thousand left limbs in iraq and afghanistan. but congressman rehberg voted against additional critical funding for prosthetic... >> jon tester votes to raise taxes... >> ryssdal: it's not hard to find political free speech in montana today. you see it all the time in what seems to be an endless run of political attack ads. >> and voted to raise the debt limit six times. >> ryssdal: the amount of money being spent is amazing. >> it could be $20 million on broadcast television. how do you like them apples? in the state of montana. >> ryssdal: so long as i know where the apples are coming from, i'm all right. that's the question. i don't know where the apples are coming from. >> right. we don't know where the apples are coming from and that's the problem here. >> ryssdal: david parker is a professor at montana state university. he's been tracking the tv ad spending in this senate race. >> it is incredibly difficult to actually figure out where this money is coming into this state and t
government promised eight new jersey counties it would cover all costs for emergency power and transportation for another week. meanwhile, in new york, new images from long island showed tons of sand washed ashore by the storm and major damage to beachfront neighborhoods. at the same time, a return to heavy city traffic early today was a sign of progress. police tried to manage the situation, by turning away cars with fewer than three passengers on select bridges into manhattan. mayor michael bloomberg pressed for people to be patient with the traffic and the broader effort to get back to normal. >> we are all in this together. we are desperately trying to help everybody. we're trying to prioritize. first thing is safety. inconvenience is down the list. if we had some people in the wrong places it was the first day getting it going. hopefully it will be better tomorrow. you have to bear with us. >> reporter: still, city officials warned that gridlock was likely to linger through the day and into the weekend, as the public transportation system comes back online. 14 of new york's subway lines
gave you huge powers over this country and that was to a prime minister who apoint the government, half of the senate and apoints some of the judges, the head of the k.g.b. and also the head of the electoral commission. do you think that's too much power concentrated in the hands of one man? >> don't you think it's time to open up, he asks? s >> the west's real agenda, the president is, is to open up the belarusian economy, which would make it vulnerable to the problems of the rest of europe. she is a jurenlist for a russian newspaper. in 2010 irina and her husband, a former presidential candidate, were jailed for organizing process. their son was 3 at the time. authorities threatened to take him away. international pressure got irina out of jail and under house arrest. >> today she is allowed to leave the house, but not the city. police visit regularly often in the middle of the night and she has another trial pending. >> one of our journalists, irina, has been arrested, and she's in this country. she can't leave the cub. i can vouch for her personally. i know she's not a criminal. can
mean what i say. >> this is not the time to double down on trickle-down government policies that have failed us. it's time for new, bold changes that measure up to the moment and that can bring america's families the certainty that the future will be better than the past. gwen: and that's just what you can see. the campaign is coming down to science -- numbers-crunching, door-knocking, message-crafting science. and that extends to politics at every level, including a critical group of tight senate races. at this point does anyone really know what is going to dies -- decide all this, gloria? >> no. [laughter] look, it's coming coup -- down to a smaller and smaller group of undecided voters. if you ralk -- talk to republicans, the karl rove theory is that this late in the race, undecided rote -- voters will go to the challenger. if you talk to workers for president obama they say that's not the case. others say they might just stay home and decide not to vote. what you saw in those clips you were just showing it the candidates making their closing arguments because in the end after all
and this next president has to deal with a divided government. gwen: i wonder how much of this is about economic development and the jobs numbers can play into that. people are saying they feel good about the economy even though they don't trust the president. >> i see these job numbers as basically being status quo. they can affect things in a big way. the decimal point kicked up one point but the actual job number was a little higher than forecasted. mitt romney has won the economy, not by a huge margin. generally, that's a good thing for a challenger. he's won the issue of bipartisan. i think president obama's trying to close some of that ground. but people will say that the ability to capture the center is important to them. they seem to be tilting a little bit in mitt romney's favor. those are good fundamentals. they don't make up, in my mind, as best we can tell for the very formidable electoral college math that is working much more in president obama's favor. gwen: what do you think about that, jackie? >> i agree. we could be looking at, we're all sort of talking and gaming an electoral
for the incumbent zero to occupy that space, that is a national function of government. >> rose: meaning that the incumbent gains something because he is in a seat of power and, therefore, he is even responding to an emergency. >> that obama can go and staley stay in washington, d.c. and monitor the disaster, right, and the press corps will treat that a as being appropriate and presidential strategy where romney goes and has. >> rose: a fund raiser. >> a fund raise never ohio and say it is just a campaign rally, so maybe it reflects bias media coverage but it does put him in more of a corner. >> has there been and is it still a momentum for governor romney that came out of the first geability in denver? >> so .. we perceived, we don't perceive anymore momentum for romney, and let me define momentum, how we would think of it and that means are you still making gapes in the polls? and what we found a is that romney gained for a couple of weeks, after denver to make it a very close race, and then kind of got is you can, in fact, maybe there is a half a point -- rose: my impression there is
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)